Latte Sessions

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Did you know you can participate in BPS Teaching and Learning Latte Sessions and earn graduate credit?

Latte Sessions are a means to provide just-in-time support to BPS staff in a relaxed environment. These 1.5 hour training sessions are provided by BPS staff on a variety of relevant educational topics.

Latte Sessions are optional, but staff are required to register for sessions in Staff Tracker. After completing 10 Latte Sessions (or 15 hours), participants may register for graduate credit in December and May of each year.

This blog area has been created for participants to post their required reflection and list the latte sessions they attended. All posts will be public and available for comment by others. This will help us all learn and grow!

Applying for credit:

  1. Participants will write a reflection about one or a combination of the strategies and tools they learned during their sessions. The reflection will explain the context for the use (curriculum/learning reason), will briefly outline the strategies, and will reflect critical and deep thought on the experience. Your reflection should be created in Google Drive. See rubric below. Archived reflections can be found here: https://goo.gl/WfGpgZ
  2. Participants will provide a link within their reflection showing evidence of how they implemented or used what was learned in at least one of the latte sessions (e.g., link to a student product, evidence of twitter chat participation, etc.).
  3. Participants will copy and paste or type their list of ten completed latte session at the bottom of their reflection (or sessions equaling 15 hours total – in rare cases some latte sessions were more than 1.5 hours). Sessions must be completed within five years at the time of your graduate credit registration. For example:
    Class 1: Latte (Admin) - Planning Effective Training (9/17/20XX) Hours: 1.5
    Class 2: Latte - Latte – Effective Questioning  (5/19/20xx) Hours: 1.5
  4. Apply for the credit using the UND online registration process. Choose Bismarck for the district and search for the class "21st Century Strategies and Tools: Latte. Registration timeframes are December and May.

Setting the stage Clearly indicates the context on which the reflection is written. Provides information on the grade-level, content focus, and learning objectives.
Purpose for learning Clearly indicates why you were interested in learning this topic.
Strategies/implementation steps Enough steps regarding the strategies for implementation are provided such that another staff member could read the reflection and the overview and learn from your experience.
Technology use and integration (if applicable) Technology use and integration is happening with both the teacher and students. Students are using technology as part of the lesson in an inquisitive and creative way.
Public Audience Blog post is written professionally, complete with formal language and free from mechanical errors.

41 comments:

  1. Beth Horning:

    12/3/2015

    I am a Social Studies teacher at Century High School. It’s hard to believe four years has passed since I took three classes titled “Latte: Netbooks for the Classroom: Setup and Restore”, “Latte: Student Response” and “Latte: GoogleApps.” Even though fours years have gone by I still use the netbook for various papers and research projects. The downside to the netbooks is they cannot print but they do allow my students to access their Google Docs accounts where they can share documents amongst their classmates for different projects. The three netbook lattes taught me the tools necessary to effectively teach my own students how to operate the netbooks in the classroom. As educators we need to stay up to date with the evolving technology and find ways to incorporate it into our instruction.

    Recently I took the “Latte: January, February, March and April 2015 BPS Twitter Tuesdays.” I have thoroughly enjoyed participating and collaborating with colleagues, district staff and administration via the Twitter Tuesday latte sessions. Twitter Tuesdays are the 2nd and 4th Tuesdays of the month starting at 8:30-9:15. The BPS Technology Director, Tanna Kincaid, posts the Twitter questions to get the conversation rolling. These sessions allow you to engage in an online discussion, share ideas, and see what others are doing with education in the district. If you are taking the latte class to use towards a graduate credit then you are required to respond to 5 prompt questions during the Tuesday session. I have always found the session to be highly engaging and an effective use of my time.
    Stepping outside the box, I recently took a couple special education lattes to become more familiar with special education programs. The “Latte: Read & Write for Google” was the first special education latte I took. I learned a great deal about this reading program. This latte taught me how to incorporate a document into the program to have it read to the student, search for other documents on the internet that are compatible for this program and discover tools and tricks within the program itself to make it easier to use. The “Latte: Intro to Boardmaker” class was about making and creating visuals for students with language barriers. Five years ago I had a student who used Boardmaker. This student did not speak and I was always searching for ways to modify the curriculum so he/she could participate in similar activities like the rest of the class. The class gave me some ideas on what type of visual supports I could create to modify social studies assignments.

    Below is the documentation for the 10 Latte classes I have taken toward the Graduate Credit totaling 15 hours:
    Latte Session Hours:
    Latte-Netbooks for the Classroom: Setup and Restore (Part 1) (8/8/2012) 1.5 hours
    Latte-Netbooks for the Classroom: Student Response (Part 2) (8/8/2012) 1.5 hours
    Latte-Netbooks for the Classroom: GoogleApps (Part 3) (8/8/2012) 1.5 hours
    Latte-January 2015 BPS Twitter Tuesdays (1/13/2015-1/27/2015) 1.5 hours
    Latte-February 2015 BPS Twitter Tuesdays (2/10/2015 - 2/24/2015) 1.5 hours
    Latte-March 2015 BPS Twitter Tuesdays (3/10/2015 - 3/24/2015) 1.5 hours
    Latte-April 2015 BPS Twitter Tuesdays (4/14/2015-4/28/2015) 1.5 hours
    Latte-Read & Write for Google (11/10/2015) 1.5 hours
    Latte: Intro to Boardmaker (12/01/2015) 1.5 hours
    Latte-Reflecting, Assembling & Applying for Latte Grad Credit 12/3/15 1.5 hrs.Total Latte Hours: 15 hours


















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  2. Lydia Betz
    12/3/15

    I remember when I just began teaching in Bismarck Public Schools, and I had some experience as a substitute teacher using an Activboard but not enough to feel efficient at using this great teaching/learning tool. With the great ActivInspire classes that I took part in, it’s become part of my everyday life for instruction in the classroom. Without this tool, I’m not sure what I’d do without it.
    I’m primarily going to concentrate on how I’ve utilized the Activboard, ActivInspire, Promethean Planet, and ActivExpressions, as most of my latte sessions were in Activboard training. The trainings began on just how to access the program, and what were the most user friendly tools in the toolbox to use in the program. Though as the Activinsprie trainings continued, I learned very quickly that Promethean Planet was a great resource that has millions of great ideas of how to demonstrate or showcase a skill in a fun and exciting way for students. Rather than being overly ambitious, I began using Promethean and editing what my students needed or didn’t needed from the specified slideshow. I have used many slide shows to demonstrate comprehension strategies, text features, math strategies, etc. This has also been wonderful for my students, so I don’t need to do all the interaction up at the board. My students are very involved in the lesson and up close and engaged in the activity!
    I also have found over the years that the desktop annotation on the ActivInspire toolbar, has become an awesome way of using internet based sites but still interactive with the Activboard. For instance, my students were able to do a math worksheet up on the Activboard, and was able to write the math strategy steps in order on the sheet on the board using the Activboard pen. Rather than wasting paper, we used our Activboard to do a quick CFA on the math strategy.
    Lastly, I’ve not had a lot of time to apply towards the ActivExpressions, because when I was trained how to use this great surveying tool so was everybody else. These were a hot commodity, and it was really difficult to check these out. Though, when I have been able to use them, it’s been a great way to survey or assess students quickly and efficiently. Most of all, we were able to be great to our environment by using no paper.

    Latte Classes I’ve Taken:
    Latte: ActivInspire for the Specialist: Class 1 of 5 1.5 Hours (2/10/2010)

    Latte - ActivInspire for the Specialist: Class 2 of 5 1.5 Hours (3/17/2010)

    Latte - ActivInspire for the Specialist: Class 3 of 5 1.5 Hours (3/8/2010)

    Latte - ActivInspire for the Specialist: Class 4 of 5 1.5 Hours (3/23/2010)

    Latte - ActivInspire for the Specialist: Class 5 of 5 1.5 Hours (4/6/2010)

    Latte - Levels of Service PowerSchool training 1.5 Hours (10/4/2010)

    MooLatte - Pioneer: ActivInspire Tips & Tricks (by Connecting Point) 1.5 Hours (11/1/2010)

    Latte: ActivExpressions Tips & Tricks 1.5 Hours (11/2/2010)

    SchooLatte - VoiceThread 1.5 Hours (4/26/2011)

    Latte-Reflecting, Assembling, and Applying for Latte Graduate Credit 1.5 Hours (12/3/2015)

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  3. https://docs.google.com/document/d/1-tV-6z8tkAGHYioqUBUx0Q8ayD8qIAq6mou97EDXZPs/edit

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    Replies
    1. Paige Wikenheiser
      Murphy ID Teacher
      Latte Credit December 2015

      I am an intellectual disabilities teacher at the elementary level and I work with students with a wide variety of different needs. Often times my students are functioning well below grade level and need a completely paralleled curriculum. As this is only my second year in the district and third year teaching, I am always looking for areas to grow as an educator and as a specialist. I felt like my training needs were better met at these more specific latte sessions rather than day-long classes offered to 1st and 2nd year teachers that are more targeted to classroom teachers.
      The first latte I attended was Read Naturally training. I had heard about this program many times prior to receiving my first job with BPS and I was always curious and wanted to know more about it. I found the latte very helpful and it really encouraged me to do more lattes, obviously. Read Naturally is a great program for some of my higher functioning students like a 3rd grader I had last year who was working on fluency and vocabulary goals. It really increased his vocabulary and he was very motivated to read the whole passage in the time allowed. This was also great because I could set a goal and required reads before hand without him there so when it came time for him to work it was the computer pushing him rather than me. This was especially helpful because this was a student who would often get upset and shut down if he did not want to do what I asked him to do. This program also completely eliminated that struggle and I was able to help him show consistent growth on his reading goal.

      I also took a few lattes involving the different programs in Boardmaker. I had used Boardmaker before but it was just the disk version I had started with and it was very limited on what you could do with it. I started with the Boardmaker Online trainings but we soon found it was very unreliable and therefore could not produce everything we had hoped. The site was often down or the activities would freeze. I was very thankful when I heard this year that we would have Boardmaker Share and Boardmaker Studio. These programs had almost all the same interactive capabilities as Boardmaker Online but did not have the problems and still offered the reliability of the old Boardmaker that I quickly found that I cannot live without. I am very often making visual schedules and things of that nature so I need Boardmaker to produce those things. However with Boardmaker Share and Studio, I was able to search a wide variety of premade activities that can be printed, as I have on the past, or played right on the computer, which is often much more motivating for students and seems like a reward when they are still working on skills to reach their goals.
      I am still glad I have attended all the lattes I have because there is no better way to know if a program is going to work for my students then trying it for myself. I have students ranging from nonverbal students whose goals are visual discrimination, to students with division goals so I need a variety of programs and materials to meet those needs. I will continue to take these lattes because I feel there are always new options and I think being as updated as possible on those options is what is best for my students.

      Delete


    2. Latte Classes as of December 22nd 2015:
      Latte- Read Naturally Training (9/4/14) 1.5 hours
      Latte- Boardmaker Online- Now What? (10/8/14)1.5 hours
      Latte- Boardmaker Online- Now What? Class 2 (10/29/14)1.5 hours
      Latte- Handling Transitions (4/1/15) 1.5 Hours
      Latte- Difficult Moments for Children and Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders (1/13/15)1.5 hours
      Latte- Boardmaker Online- Let’s Get Moving (2/2/15)1.5 hours
      Latte- Cricksoft App Intro and Training (10/6/15)1.5 Hours
      Latte- Supervising Paraeducators (10/12/15) 1.5 Hours
      Latte- November 2015 BPS Twitter Tuesdays (11/3/15) 1.5 Hours
      Latte- Boardmaker Studio- Let’s Get Moving (11/17/15) 1.5 Hours
      Total Hours- 15

      https://www.boardmakeronline.com/You/Home
      https://twitter.com/PWikenheiser

      Delete
  4. Carrie Axt
    5/11/2016

    As a speech-language pathologist in the elementary schools, I have attended latte sessions that target professional growth as I serve students with varying learning and communication needs. I have benefited through collaboration with colleagues within latte sessions. A list of some strategies and resources I have implemented from my learning are outlined below.

    *In “Handling Transitions,” I learned a variety of strategies and visual supports to use to help students, particularly those with transition difficulties as is common with students with autism spectrum disorders, transition from one activity to the next. On a regular basis, I use a countdown strip that notes when there are 5-4-3-2-1 minutes remaining in the current activity. The numbers are on individual velcro strips and are removed one-by-one until the activity stops. Another transition support is a stoplight visual (see below). I use this to provie a visual in preparation to when one activity will end and another will occur. Many students have responded well to this visual support to make an abstract measure such as time more concrete, and in turn, improve their management of ending one thing and beginning another.
    https://goo.gl/L3wDNj

    *In “Project Based Learning Implementation Evidence Support Session,” Tanna Kincaid walked my PBL partner and me through reflection and collecting supporting evidence of our project. It was helpful to have the time with my PBL project partner to gather student evidence and reflect on the successes our students had in their independence and learning.
    https://goo.gl/o2SNhV

    https://goo.gl/mlzC8l

    *“Cricksoft App Intro and Training” was facilitated by one of our Assistive Technology staff members who fielded questions to a software expert. This expert was walked us through an app designed to support writing in students with challenges in generating ideas, formulating sentences, and otherwise creating written products. Since the training, I have had the opportunity to use the technology with a number of students and create new pages on their devices to support them in their writing projects.

    *Similarly, “Using BoardMaker Share to Provide Reading and Visual Supports” by Larissa Schwab was an excellent demonstration of how to find and create additional supports to struggling learners. While it is time intensive and expensive to create, print, laminate, and assemble these materials, this resource helps to improve efficiency in creating valuable tools for students.

    *The “WonderGrove” presentation by Megan Goetz provided a rich opportunity to explore and gain access to a social-behavioral curriculum to use with young students. While I was a part of the pilot program last year, I did not have access to the program this year until attending this beneficial latte. I appreciate the opportunity to gather with colleagues and learn how to improve my practice in serving students with unique needs. This latte session, and many others this year, allowed me to do that.
    http://goo.gl/wk8FGM

    Latte Sessions:
    1. Latte: Handling Transitions (4/1/2015)
    2. Latte-HEC-Reflecting, Assembling, and Applying for Latte Graduate Credit (5/13/2015)
    3. Latte - April 2015 BPS Twitter Tuesdays (4/14/2015 - 4/28/2015)
    4. Latte - Project Based Learning Implementation Evidence Support Session (6/25/2015)
    5. Latte - Cricksoft App Intro & Training (10/6/2015)
    6. Latte: Using Boardmaker Share to Provide Reading and Visual Supports (12/7/2015)
    7. Special Education: WonderGrove (11/23/2015)
    8. Latte - March 2016 BPS Twitter Tuesdays (3/8/2016 8:30 p.m. - 9:15 p.m.)
    9. Latte - April 2016 BPS Twitter Tuesdays (4/5/2016 8:30 p.m. - 9:15 p.m.)
    10. Latte-Reflecting, Assembling, and Applying for Latte Graduate Credit (5/11/2016)

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  5. Meghan Kleven
    Liberty Strategist
    May 2015
    I am a second year special education teacher at Liberty Elementary. Before coming to Bismarck, I taught special education in Mandan for 7 years. Most of my previous experience was as an LD teacher and currently I serve students with LD and ID as well. Being new to the district has put me on quite the steep learning curve, and I am grateful for the latte sessions that have helped me learn new programs and how to effectively use them with my students.
    One particularly helpful latte was Supervising Paras, where I got some great tips and monitoring forms for maintaining fidelity to programs when aides are working with students. Checklists that monitor visual discrimination and levels of cueing systems have helped the paras collect data for students when responding to others. I have used this data tracking for two of my ID students and this has helped me collect data regarding their IEP goals and objectives. https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B52FlaW_vCuIR1hOWDN3WGtqa0k/view?usp=sharing
    Other latte sessions that I ended up using on a regular basis were the Boardmaker Studio and Boardmaker Share sessions. With the knowledge of this program, I created visuals to support student schedules, instruction, and social skill acquisition. I am currently using Boardmaker visuals in correlation to the Zones of Regulation program and this has significantly reduced the behaviors of one of my nonverbal students. https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B52FlaW_vCuIVy1iT2xycVJlZjA/view?usp=sharing
    Read & Write for Google has helped support my students with learning disabilities and they have been able to compose written pieces using the “speech to text” features. One student in particular can efficiently compose a story based on his ideas and he does not have to worry about spelling. He is also able to edit his work in a timely manner.
    The best part about these latte sessions is that after leaving each one, I felt like I had the knowledge of and experience with the programs to go back and use them with my students. I was able to develop some materials in class and some when I returned to my classroom. The following is a list of the 10 latte classes that I attended to compose the 15 hours.
    Read Naturally Training—9/4/14
    Difficult Moments for Children and Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders—1/13/15
    Supervising paras—10/12/15
    Read & Write for Google—11/10/15
    Boardmaker Studio-Let’s Get Moving—11/17/15
    Using Boardmaker Share to Provide Reading and Visual Supports—12/7/15
    Clicker 6—12/8/15
    You Can’t Just Say It Louder: Teaching Strategies That Work for English Language Learners—4/11/16
    What in the World is a Welcome Center—4/25/16
    Reflecting, Assembling, and Applying for Latte Graduate Credit—5/11/16

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  6. Carrie Axt
    May 2016


    In this course, “Latte: Miller Google Sites,” I learned about creating a website to use in my role as a specialist in the district. My specialists team collaborated to identify needs we’d like to address through a website. Ideas included an introductions of specialist staff members, information about the law re: special education services, and useful links for students and families. Next steps include continuing to revise and add to the website and publish on school-wide newsletters and communications in order for students and families to use to gain information and make a closer connection with their school's specialist team.

    Latte - Miller Google Sites (1/4/2016 - 6/3/2016)
    15 hours

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  7. This Latte was very helpful as it showed me how to set up a site to put on the website for our school. It gave me the time to look at other sites and ask many questions of what is needed on my own. During this time, I was able to make a calendar to share, as well as, make a site to have up and share with our school at the beginning of the school year. I made an about me page, an events page and a links page that I feel may be very helpful to my students in the upcoming year.

    Latte - Miller Google Sites (1/4/2016 - 6/3/2016) 15 Hours

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  8. I have had the opportunity to take many different lattes to help me in my classroom. These have helped me grow as an individual and I have had the time to use these in my classroom with students. Technology is a big part of the students learning and I feel that the more I can take and learn, the more I can give to the students.

    My students love to use the ActivBoard for many different activities. I am always looking for new ways to incorporate this into my classroom. With the help of Lattes, this make it easier for me to use the ActivBoard and help my colleagues use it too.

    I enjoy using technology in my classroom and will continue to find new ways to incorporate the new ideas programs as they come about.

    1. Latte ActivBoards - Miller (11/12/2013)
    2. SchoolLatte-ActivInspire (2/21/2013)
    3. Latte - Fraction Nation Webinar (by invite only) (1/23/2013)
    4. SchoolLatte-Symbaloo (1/17/2013)
    5. Latte – Netbooks for the Classroom: Setup and Restore (Part 1) (1/16/2013)
    6. Latte - 2012 BIM Requirements and Planning (BIMs only) (11/6/2012)
    7. Flipchart Creation (4/10/2012)
    8. SchooLatte - ActivInspire (1/24/2012)
    9. SchooLatte - PhotoStory (12/15/2011)
    10. Latte - A picture is worth a Thousand Words (8/17/2011)

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  9. I am so thankful I was able to take this Latte. This class helped me to set up a site for my classroom that could be linked to our school website. We were given time to look at other teacher's websites as well as ask tons of questions to both the instructor and our peers. During this time, I also made a calendar to share. Hopefully I will be able to debut a brand new class site at the beginning of the year with my students and their parents that includes information about myself, events and important dates, website links for our classroom, and other important and relevant information.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I found this Latte to be very helpful in setting up a site to put on the website for our school. It allowed me to look at other websites and ask several questions of what is needed on my own. During this Latte, I was able to make a shareable calendar, as well as, make my own website to have up and share with our school at the beginning of next year. I put together an about me page, an events page and a links page that will be helpful to my students and parents next year.

    Latte - Miller Google Sites (1/4/2016 - 6/3/2016) 15 Hours

    ReplyDelete
  11. I found this Latte to be very helpful in setting up a site to put on the website for our school. It allowed me to look at other websites and ask several questions of what is needed on my own. During this Latte, I was able to make a shareable calendar, as well as, make my own website to have up and share with our school at the beginning of next year. I put together an about me page, an events page and a links page that will be helpful to my students and parents next year.

    Latte - Miller Google Sites (1/4/2016 - 6/3/2016) 15 Hours

    ReplyDelete
  12. I am so glad that I was able to take this Latte. This class helped me to create a site for my class which could then be linked to our school website. I was given time to look at other teacher’s websites as well as to ask tons of questions to the instructor and my peers. I was also given time to work on my site. During this Latte, I was able to create a calendar to be shared with others. I was also able to create a class site that I can hopefully debut to my students and parents right away in the fall. This site will include information about myself, events happening in our classroom, links to important websites, and other relevant information.

    Latte - Miller Google Sites (1/4/2016 - 6/3/2016) 15 Hours

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  13. I am thankful I was able to take this latte, even though it was a bit of a challenge to get over to Miller from Northridge in time for class. However, Cathy was nice enough to stay after class with me and catch me up on anything I missed. In this class, I created a classroom webpage that I can share with parents in order to keep them up to date on events happening in the classroom as well as important websites they might find useful. I also learned how to make a Google calendar that I can share with parents. In this website, I also placed an introduction to me so students and parents can get to know me as well as contact information in case they need to get in touch with me.
    Latte - Miller Google Sites (1/4/2016 - 6/3/2016) 15 Hours

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  14. I am thankful I was able to take this latte, even though it was a bit of a challenge to get over to Miller from Northridge in time for class. However, Cathy was nice enough to stay after class with me and catch me up on anything I missed. In this class, I created a classroom webpage that I can share with parents in order to keep them up to date on events happening in the classroom as well as important websites they might find useful. I also learned how to make a Google calendar that I can share with parents. In this website, I also placed an introduction to me so students and parents can get to know me as well as contact information in case they need to get in touch with me.
    Latte - Miller Google Sites (1/4/2016 - 6/3/2016) 15 Hours

    ReplyDelete
  15. Carrie Axt
    May 2016


    In this course, “Latte: Miller Google Sites,” I learned about creating a website to use in my role as a specialist in the district. My specialists team collaborated to identify needs we’d like to address through a website. Ideas included an introductions of specialist staff members, information about the law re: special education services, and useful links for students and families.

    Latte - Miller Google Sites (1/4/2016 - 6/3/2016)
    15 hours

    ReplyDelete
  16. I have completed "Miller Google Sites" with Cathy Schatz, who was very patient and helpful as I learned how to set up a District website. Having a classroom website has been a goal for me, and I am getting closer having taken this course. I am anxious to continue working on my site to make it useful and beneficial for my parents and students in the fall. I have much to learn about setting up a web page, but this class was instrumental in helping me see the benefits of a classroom webpage.

    Latte - Miller Google Sites (1/4/2016 - 6/3/2016)
    15 hours

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  17. I have always wanted to have a classroom webpage, but was overwhelmed by the process. Cathy Schatz helped me through the maze of setting up a classroom webpage through her class called "Miller Google Sites." I am excited to be putting together a page that will be beneficial for my students and for myself. I have much to learn, but I feel more confident after having attended these latte sessions. My goal is to have this up and ready for the fall.

    Latte - Miller Google Sites (1/4/2016 - 6/3/2016)
    15 hours

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  18. This Latte Course, Miller Google Sites, was very helpful in providing the necessary information to put a classroom website together. We were able to create pages for different items that would be helpful for parents looking for information on your classroom. We were able to insert a calendar with important events, a page for parents to learn about you, a page for web links that could be helpful for both parents and students at home, and pages with other information.

    Latte - Miller Google Sites (1/4/2016 - 6/3/2016) 15 Hours

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  19. This Latte course was very beneficial. I learned how to build a website for Bismarck Public Schools in order to use it right away at the beginning of the school year. I am able to create pages and subpages to my website. I also added many sites that would be useful to students. I have already inserted a calendar that I can start filling in at the beginning of the year.

    Latte- Miller Google Sites (1/4/16-6/3/16) 15 hours

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  20. This Latte course Miller Sites helped me prepare a website and collect information necessary to get a full website together in the fall. I will be able to insert a calendar and important information for parents.

    Latte-Miller Google Sites (1/4/2016-6/3/2016) 15 hours

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  21. As a speech-language pathologist and team member at Miller school, I am grateful for my experience in learning how to put together a classroom (or specialist) website. I hope to continue to work on it and refine it for more ready access by parents next year. I am thankful for Cathy Schatz's and Shawn Smith's help with this class and will look to them as resources in the future.

    Latte- Miller Google Sites (1/4/2016-6/3/2016) 15 Hours

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  22. I am a 5th grade teacher at Miller Elementary School. I took the Google Sites class and started the process of working on my new classroom webpage. This page will be accessible to parents and students in my class and will provide them with critical information for the class such as the handbook, calendar information and assignment information.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Latte- Miller Google Sites (1/4/2016-6/3/2016) 15 Hours

      Delete
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  24. I have never created a website before, and I have always been interested in creating one for school. This Latte Course, Miller Google Sites, provided me with the direction and motivation to get started on one. I have always been very overwhelmed with the idea of starting. I enjoyed some of the features that we could include on the site. I feel more confident now navigating through the process. I love the idea of specialists working together to create a site as a team.

    Latte - Miller Google Sites (1/4/2016 - 6/3/2016)
    15 hours

    ReplyDelete
  25. I have never created a website before, and I have always been interested in creating one for school. This Latte Course, Miller Google Sites, provided me with the direction and motivation to get started on one. I have always been very overwhelmed with the idea of starting. I enjoyed some of the features that we could include on the site. I feel more confident now navigating through the process. I love the idea of specialists working together to create a site as a team.

    Latte - Miller Google Sites (1/4/2016 - 6/3/2016)
    15 hours

    ReplyDelete
  26. In this course, “Latte: Miller Google Sites,” I learned about creating a classroom website. Our specialist team collaborated create a specialist website. Some of our ideas included introductions of specialist staff and also parent resources.
    Latte- Miller Google Sites (1/4/2016-6/3/2016) 15 Hours

    ReplyDelete
  27. This Google Sites Latte was an excellent introduction for me. I practiced many things that I can apply to website creation. I still have lots to learn. Dana Gendreau
    Latte- Miller Google Sites (1/4/2016-6/3/2016) 15 Hours

    ReplyDelete
  28. In this course, “Latte: Miller Google Sites,” I learned about creating a classroom website. Our specialists team collaborated to create a specialist website together.Some of our ideas included introductions of our specialist staff and also resources for parents.

    Latte - Miller Google Sites (1/4/2016 - 6/3/2016)
    15 hours

    ReplyDelete
  29. This Latte Course, Miller Google Sites, was helping with providing with information to create a website for my class. I learned how to create a calendar and add other useful information to the website. A website will be a useful resource for teachers to connect with parents.

    Latte-Miller Google Sites (1/4/2016-6/3/2016) 15 hours

    ReplyDelete
  30. As a third grade teacher, communication is a vital part of my job. I am pleased to have the ability and knowledge to create a google site to share with parents and staff. Any technology that furthers our relationships with BPS families is worthy of our time and energy. Great latte.
    Latte - Miller Google Sites (1/4/2016 - 6/3/2016)
    15 hours

    ReplyDelete
  31. I am a 1st Grade teacher at Miller Elementary School. I took the Google Sites class and update my classroom webpage every Friday. This page is accessible to parents on the Miller School website. This site contains my schedule and my handbook and weekly classroom news. This was a wonderful course with useful resources for my classroom parents!

    ReplyDelete
  32. I am a kindergarten teacher Miller Elementary School. I took the Google Sites class and update my classroom webpage every week. This page will will be accessible to parents on the Miller School website. It is used to communicate with them regarding our calendar, handbook, and newsletters. This was a wonderful course with useful resources for parents and information to help us communicate with them.

    ReplyDelete
  33. This Latte was very beneficial. This class helped me work on a site for my classroom which could then be linked to our school website. I spent time looking at other teacher’s websites. I was able to ask several questions to the instructor and my peers. I was able to spend working on my site. I was shown how to create a calendar to be shared with others. I began creating a class site for the first time. This site will include information about myself, events happening in our classroom, links to important websites, and other important information.

    Latte- Miller Google Sites (1/4/20116-6/3/2016) 15 hours

    ReplyDelete


  34. Re-Thinking the Evaluation Framework for Eligibility Purposes
    Many of today’s students who are deaf and hard of hearing in mainstream settings demonstrate listening, speech and language skills on par with their peers with typical hearing along with sufficient academic progress. This often leads to the inaccurate conclusion that these students do not require specially designed supports. However, students may have difficulties advocating for their needs, or struggle with higher level academic language skills.
    Students don’t need to show a delay to be eligible for services but an impact on education. There is a paradigm shift for planning evaluations. Think impact verses delay; process learning verses product skills and access verses attendance. Look at the development not from a delay perspective but an impact perspective. Use both formal measures and functional tools. Discuss the impact of the hearing loss prior to discussion of assessment results.
    Single-Word Vocabulary Practice: It Makes a Difference
    In order for children with hearing loss to develop adequate spoken language skills, they must have sufficient vocabulary. It’s been well documented that vocabulary development has a measurable impact on the development of language skills. Without the ability to understand and use a variety of word types, it is essentially impossible to understand a series of words or to string a series of words together to produce one’s thoughts and ideas.
    Self-Advocacy: Building Social Relationships
    Self-advocacy is an essential skill necessary for students with hearing loss to develop in order for them to cultivate strong social relationships.
    Games and Things: There’s an App for That and an iPad Too!, Click on This!, Fun and Games: The Many Sides of Velcro
    The use of multimedia technology is social, engaging and fun. When used purposefully, it can support brain development. There are a variety of apps and other multimedia technologies that are currently available that may be effective tools for language development, aural (re)habilitation and social skill building for school-aged children with hearing loss. Apps can reinforce home carryover of goals related to auditory skills, receptive and expressive vocabulary, morphology/syntax, social language and literacy development.
    Engaging the Rewired Brain
    Research in neuroscience is revealing the impact that technology is having on brain growth and development. Studies have shown that technology affects students’ attention (sustained attention), memory, thinking and social behavior
    Turning Pages: Progress and Opportunity Through Books
    Use real objects to support the understanding of stories and to develop language. Use stories to teach the understanding of emotions beyond happy and sad. Adults need to highlight and discuss different situations so kids understand the differences in character perspectives. Even at the youngest age, start talking about the plots of the story. Using the strategies of Theory of the Mind can help a child move past basic vocabulary and start using higher level tier two vocabulary. Book use and language increases listening vocabulary, attention span, and challenges the mind and memory.
    Learning to Listen: Theory to Practice
    This hands-on session provided opportunities to apply the knowledge we have about listening and spoken language for children with hearing loss and using it to analyze demonstrations for intervention effectiveness and offer critique as to what the clinician could have done differently.
    Living Large with Language Learning
    Blend school vocabulary with life experience vocabulary to form a complete picture. Allow children to infer and think beyond their own senses. Use books, props, and perspectives to prompt questions. Utilize Theory of the Mind – What if…, I wonder…., What do you think, Bet you can’t guess, What could happen, Remember when….. Recognize language opportunities within expectations and the importance of implementing sociolinguistic activities. The child’s world is as large as their language ability.

    ReplyDelete
  35. Re-Thinking the Evaluation Framework for Eligibility Purposes
    Many of today’s students who are deaf and hard of hearing in mainstream settings demonstrate listening, speech and language skills on par with their peers with typical hearing along with sufficient academic progress. This often leads to the inaccurate conclusion that these students do not require specially designed supports. However, students may have difficulties advocating for their needs, or struggle with higher level academic language skills.
    Students don’t need to show a delay to be eligible for services but an impact on education. There is a paradigm shift for planning evaluations. Think impact verses delay; process learning verses product skills and access verses attendance. Look at the development not from a delay perspective but an impact perspective. Use both formal measures and functional tools. Discuss the impact of the hearing loss prior to discussion of assessment results.
    Single-Word Vocabulary Practice: It Makes a Difference
    In order for children with hearing loss to develop adequate spoken language skills, they must have sufficient vocabulary. It’s been well documented that vocabulary development has a measurable impact on the development of language skills. Without the ability to understand and use a variety of word types, it is essentially impossible to understand a series of words or to string a series of words together to produce one’s thoughts and ideas.
    Self-Advocacy: Building Social Relationships
    Self-advocacy is an essential skill necessary for students with hearing loss to develop in order for them to cultivate strong social relationships.
    Games and Things: There’s an App for That and an iPad Too!, Click on This!, Fun and Games: The Many Sides of Velcro
    The use of multimedia technology is social, engaging and fun. When used purposefully, it can support brain development. There are a variety of apps and other multimedia technologies that are currently available that may be effective tools for language development, aural (re)habilitation and social skill building for school-aged children with hearing loss. Apps can reinforce home carryover of goals related to auditory skills, receptive and expressive vocabulary, morphology/syntax, social language and literacy development.
    Engaging the Rewired Brain
    Research in neuroscience is revealing the impact that technology is having on brain growth and development. Studies have shown that technology affects students’ attention (sustained attention), memory, thinking and social behavior
    Turning Pages: Progress and Opportunity Through Books
    Use real objects to support the understanding of stories and to develop language. Use stories to teach the understanding of emotions beyond happy and sad. Adults need to highlight and discuss different situations so kids understand the differences in character perspectives. Even at the youngest age, start talking about the plots of the story. Using the strategies of Theory of the Mind can help a child move past basic vocabulary and start using higher level tier two vocabulary. Book use and language increases listening vocabulary, attention span, and challenges the mind and memory.
    Learning to Listen: Theory to Practice
    This hands-on session provided opportunities to apply the knowledge we have about listening and spoken language for children with hearing loss and using it to analyze demonstrations for intervention effectiveness and offer critique as to what the clinician could have done differently.
    Living Large with Language Learning
    Blend school vocabulary with life experience vocabulary to form a complete picture. Allow children to infer and think beyond their own senses. Use books, props, and perspectives to prompt questions. Utilize Theory of the Mind – What if…, I wonder…., What do you think, Bet you can’t guess, What could happen, Remember when….. Recognize language opportunities within expectations and the importance of implementing sociolinguistic activities. The child’s world is as large as their language ability.

    ReplyDelete
  36. Re-Thinking the Evaluation Framework for Eligibility PurposesMany of today’s students who are deaf and hard of hearing in mainstream settings demonstrate listening, speech and language skills on par with their peers with typical hearing along with sufficient academic progress. This often leads to the inaccurate conclusion that these students do not require specially designed supports. However, students may have difficulties advocating for their needs, or struggle with higher level academic language skills. Students don’t need to show a delay to be eligible for services but an impact on education. There is a paradigm shift for planning evaluations. Think impact verses delay; process learning verses product skills and access verses attendance.
    Single-Word Vocabulary Practice: It Makes a Difference In order for children with hearing loss to develop adequate spoken language skills, they must have sufficient vocabulary. It’s been well documented that vocabulary development has a measurable impact on the development of language skills. Without the ability to understand and use a variety of word types, it is essentially impossible to understand a series of words or to string a series of words together to produce one’s thoughts and ideas.
    Self-Advocacy: Building Social Relationships Self-advocacy is an essential skill necessary for students with hearing loss to develop in order for them to cultivate strong social relationships.
    Games and Things: There’s an App for That and an iPad Too!, Click on This!, Fun and Games: The Many Sides of VelcroThe use of multimedia technology is social, engaging and fun. When used purposefully, it can support brain development. There are a variety of apps and other multimedia technologies that are currently available that may be effective tools for language development, aural (re)habilitation and social skill building for school-aged children with hearing loss. Apps can reinforce home carryover of goals related to auditory skills, receptive and expressive vocabulary, morphology/syntax, social language and literacy development.
    Engaging the Rewired Brain
    Research in neuroscience is revealing the impact that technology is having on brain growth and development. Studies have shown that technology affects students’ attention (sustained attention), memory, thinking and social behavior
    Turning Pages: Progress and Opportunity Through Books
    Use real objects to support the understanding of stories and to develop language. Use stories to teach the understanding of emotions beyond happy and sad. Adults need to highlight and discuss different situations so kids understand the differences in character perspectives. Even at the youngest age, start talking about the plots of the story. increases listening vocabulary, attention span, and challenges the mind and memory.
    Learning to Listen: Theory to Practice This hands-on session provided opportunities to apply the knowledge we have about listening and spoken language for children with hearing loss and using it to analyze demonstrations for intervention effectiveness and offer critique as to what the clinician could have done differently.
    Living Large with Language Learning
    Blend school vocabulary with life experience vocabulary to form a complete picture. Allow children to infer and think beyond their own senses. Use books, props, and perspectives to prompt questions. Utilize Theory of the Mind – What if…, I wonder…., What do you think, Bet you can’t guess, What could happen, Remember when….. Recognize language opportunities within expectations and the importance of implementing sociolinguistic activities. The child’s world is as large as their language ability.
    A Strengths-Based Approach to Hearing Loss
    Identify strengths: strengths questionnaire found at headstrongnation.org. Use concrete assessments such as Minnesota Social Skills Checklist or the Informal Inventory of Independent and Self-Advocacy Skills. Success attitudes: resiliency, integration, self-awareness, proactive, goal setting, emotional stability, and social supports.

    ReplyDelete
  37. Re-Thinking the Evaluation Framework for Eligibility Purposes
    Many of today’s students who are deaf and hard of hearing in mainstream settings demonstrate listening, speech and language skills on par with their peers with typical hearing along with sufficient academic progress. This often leads to the inaccurate conclusion that these students do not require specially designed supports. However, students may have difficulties advocating for their needs, or struggle with higher level academic language skills.
    Students don’t need to show a delay to be eligible for services but an impact on education. There is a paradigm shift for planning evaluations. Think impact verses delay; process learning verses product skills and access verses attendance. Look at the development not from a delay perspective but an impact perspective. Use both formal measures and functional tools. Discuss the impact of the hearing loss prior to discussion of assessment results.
    Single-Word Vocabulary Practice: It Makes a Difference
    In order for children with hearing loss to develop adequate spoken language skills, they must have sufficient vocabulary. It’s been well documented that vocabulary development has a measurable impact on the development of language skills. Without the ability to understand and use a variety of word types, it is essentially impossible to understand a series of words or to string a series of words together to produce one’s thoughts and ideas.
    Self-Advocacy: Building Social Relationships
    Self-advocacy is an essential skill necessary for students with hearing loss to develop in order for them to cultivate strong social relationships.
    Games and Things: There’s an App for That and an iPad Too!, Click on This!, Fun and Games: The Many Sides of Velcro
    The use of multimedia technology is social, engaging and fun. When used purposefully, it can support brain development. There are a variety of apps and other multimedia technologies that are currently available that may be effective tools for language development, aural (re)habilitation and social skill building for school-aged children with hearing loss. Apps can reinforce home carryover of goals related to auditory skills, receptive and expressive vocabulary, morphology/syntax, social language and literacy development.
    Engaging the Rewired Brain
    Research in neuroscience is revealing the impact that technology is having on brain growth and development. Studies have shown that technology affects students’ attention (sustained attention), memory, thinking and social behavior
    Turning Pages: Progress and Opportunity Through Books
    Use real objects to support the understanding of stories and to develop language. Use stories to teach the understanding of emotions beyond happy and sad. Adults need to highlight and discuss different situations so kids understand the differences in character perspectives. Even at the youngest age, start talking about the plots of the story. Using the strategies of Theory of the Mind can help a child move past basic vocabulary and start using higher level tier two vocabulary. Book use and language increases listening vocabulary, attention span, and challenges the mind and memory.
    Learning to Listen: Theory to Practice
    This hands-on session provided opportunities to apply the knowledge we have about listening and spoken language for children with hearing loss and using it to analyze demonstrations for intervention effectiveness and offer critique as to what the clinician could have done differently.
    Living Large with Language Learning
    Blend school vocabulary with life experience vocabulary to form a complete picture. Allow children to infer and think beyond their own senses. Use books, props, and perspectives to prompt questions. Utilize Theory of the Mind – What if…, I wonder…., What do you think, Bet you can’t guess, What could happen, Remember when….. Recognize language opportunities within expectations and the importance of implementing sociolinguistic activities. The child’s world is as large as their language ability.

    ReplyDelete